Voting in Jordan

Voting for the Jordan Public Schools referendum and special school board election will take place at the Community Education and Recreation Center.

On Nov. 5, local voters will decide whether or not to approve a $39.5 million Jordan Public Schools referendum that consists of three proposals which increase the student levy and secure building bonds for a variety of improvement projects.

Voting will take place at the Community Education and Recreation Center, 500 Sunset Drive, from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m on Tuesday, Nov. 5. Early voting is available weekdays at the district office (in the same building) from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Nov. 4.

Applications for mail-in ballots can be picked up at the district office or found online at www.jordan.k12.mn.us/Page/1434. Completed applications can be mailed or dropped off to 500 Sunset Drive, Suite 1 Jordan, MN 55352; emailed to hmack@isd717.org; or faxed to 952-492-4445.

Referendum

The first question on the November ballot will ask voters to raise the per-student operational levy by $300. If this measure fails, funding for the rest of the proposed projects is not possible, essentially causing the entire referendum to fail.

In addition to providing operating dollars for proposed projects, district officials said a levy increase will keep elementary class sizes down, expand and improve elective offerings at the middle and high schools and help retain and attract quality employees.

The second question will ask voters to approve a $24.5 million bond that will fund four large projects: the construction of an early learning services building, elementary school renovations, a high school remodel and improved parking and drives.

The third question will ask voters to approve a $15 million bond that will fund two large projects: the expansion and improvement of the high school auditorium and the construction of a multipurpose field house on the “south campus.”

Local taxpayers currently pitch in $724 per student — the state-mandated bare minimum. That number only indicates an average, however; not every Jordan household contributes $724. The amount is totaled and divvied up among taxpayers based on their property value. So the average Jordan home, valued at $250,000, contributes $1,049 in taxes to fund the school district’s operating authority and building bonds.

If only the levy measure is approved, that average will rise to $1,178 annually — marking a $128.52 annual increase for the average Jordan home, or $10.71 per month. A $125,000 home would see a $64.32 annual increase, while a home valued at $550,000 would see an annual increase of $282.84.

If all three referendum measures are approved by voters, that average will rise to $1,505 annually — marking a $456 annual increase for the average Jordan home, or about $38 per month. A $125,000 home would see a $201 annual increase, while a home valued at $550,000 would see an annual increase of $1,064.

School board election

This summer Ryan Dahnert was appointed by the school board to fill a seat vacated by Jesse Erdal, who stepped down in June before moving out of state. Dahnert’s appointment lasts until Dec. 31. The following term will be decided by the outcome of the Nov. 5 election, in which Dahnert runs unopposed.

Dahnert, a father of three Jordan students and member of the Jordan Economic Development Authority, is vice president of sales and marketing for Plymold, a Burnsville-based furniture manufacturer. He is also serving as interim CEO for Plymold’s parent company, Foldcraft.

Correction: this article previously said approval of question one would raise the operating levy to $1,178 per pupil unit. The correct figure is $1,024 per pupil unit ($1,178 is the amount the average household would contribute). The Independent regrets the error.

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